USF Archives Sought Out For Perspective on Johns Committee

Reading Time: 4 minutes Andy Huse, Librarian and Curator for Florida History in Special Collections, USF Libraries, Tampa Campus shares how he assisted Emma Pettit, Senior Reporter at the Chronicle of Higher Education, in her research into the Johns Committee.

Celebrating the Public Domain through digitization

Reading Time: 3 minutes Join the USF Libraries in our annual celebration of the public domain through digitization! The USF Libraries have selected material from the Libraries’ collections published in 1927 that are newly in the public domain to digitize in celebration. This is the fifth year we have celebrated through digitization! 

Crowd Sourced Archival Collections in Libraries

Reading Time: 2 minutes The Library of Congress has addressed the challenge of keyword searching manuscript texts by opening its archives to citizen historians and asking for help to make their online collections more accessible by transcribing materials and providing transcription reviews through their program, called By the People!

Green OA and self-archiving: Using your Author’s Approved Manuscript (AAM) to increase the impact of your research

Reading Time: 2 minutes Authors, who take extra steps after publication by sharing and advertising their work, can help to increase the impact of their publications.  One method of increasing a journal article’s audience is to make use of the publisher’s author rights or author posting policies by contributing an Author’s Approved Manuscript (AAM) to an institutional repository.

Florida Ornithological Society Partnership Takes Flight

Reading Time: 4 minutes Andrew Huse, Librarian and Curator for Florida Studies at Special Collections, USF Libraries, Tampa campus recounts his attendance and contributions to the 50th annual meeting of the Florida Ornithological Society.

USF Curiosities: A 40-foot Band-Aid?

Reading Time: 5 minutes Mom! Mom, look! A giant Band-Aid! Walking into a hospital can be a scary experience for anyone. But, for a sick child, walking into a hospital seems particularly daunting. The Children’s Research Institute (CRI) at the University of South Florida’s St. Petersburg …Continue Reading

Botanical Resources from USF

Reading Time: 2 minutes Extreme environmental and climate changes have caught the attention of politics and the news, pushing environmental sciences into the spotlight.  Like the USF Libraries Florida Environment and Natural History collections, the Atlas of Florida Plants from the Institute of Systematic Botany and USF Species Catalog have been documenting environmental studies for decades.  Both resources collect information on plant species and provide a background against which to observe changes in the botanical world.

Florida’s Greatest Hurricane Exhibit

Reading Time: 2 minutes The USF Libraries’ Florida’s Great Hurricane Exhibit shares the history of some of the most influential hurricanes to make landfall on Florida’s shores, as captured in the archives.

Introducing Digital Commons @ USF

Reading Time: 2 minutes We are happy to announce a new, consolidated, Institutional Repository at the USF Libraries!  The new repository, Digital Commons at the University of South Florida, highlights the research of USF faculty, students, and staff across our three campuses as well as features conferences, scholar profiles, digital collections, theses and dissertations, and open access textbooks and journals.

#Creekshed – USF Creek Shed Digital Collection

Reading Time: 2 minutes USF Libraries is collaborating with Dr. Thomas Hallock (USF St. Petersburg campus) and Dr. Amanda Hagood (Eckerd College) to archive a series of columns called City Wilds for the newspaper Creative Loafing Tampa Bay. The articles are intended to highlight various creek sheds around the Tampa Bay area. Dr. Hallock finds it important to make sure the conversation on this topic is sustained. In an effort to get the word out on these pieces, Dr. Hallock and Dr. Hagood created and put into use an easily taggable hashtag name, #creekshed.