Celebrating Earth Day with a look at ELAPP

Reading Time: 2 minutes The Environmental Lands Acquisition and Protection Program (ELAPP) was established by Hillsborough County voters in the late 1980s.  Since its establishment, ELAPP has protected over 61,000 acres of rare habitat in Hillsborough County.  Digital Dialogs celebrates Earth Day with a closer look at this program.

Open Source Tools for Exhibit Building

Reading Time: 3 minutes As we all navigate through a world with more online meetings, learning, and events than ever before, finding a way to express our thoughts visually has presented new challenges and opportunities. There are a lot of exciting ways to incorporate exhibits and webpages into your classes or Digital Humanities projects, whether you’re using your own photos, items from Digital Collections, or research collected during your last visit to Special Collections. USF Libraries subscribes to two of the leading platforms for creating exhibit content, Omeka and ArcGIS StoryMaps. Below, we’ll introduce both of those platforms along with other open source and subscription-based platforms available to USF students.

Celebrating Black History Month with a Portrait of Blanche Armwood

Reading Time: 5 minutes In honor of Black History Month, Digital Dialogs would like to highlight the story of one local leader for her commitment to education and equality. Blanche Armwood became a prominent figure on the national stage, known for her dedication to education and social reform.

The Roseate Spoonbill: A Fight for Survival

Reading Time: 5 minutes As a result of the “feather craze” that decimated Florida’s bird populations, the Florida Audubon Society found that the roseate spoonbill had been the mostly heavily hit. Plume hunters and poachers sought out the roseate spoonbill for its beautiful, bright pink and …Continue Reading

The Florida Public Health Oral History Project

Reading Time: 2 minutes Post written by Jane Duncan
Today, more than ever, public health officials contribute to the health and wellness of our communities through disease prevention programs, education, clean water initiatives, disaster relief, laboratory research, and more. It is important to document the knowledge of prominent experts so that we can continue to learn from them for years to come. That’s what makes projects like USF’s Florida Public Health Oral History Project so vital. As we contend with the spread of this global pandemic, we invite you to learn more about the vital field of public health.