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Workshop Objectives

Instructors: For each workshop, you may review the learning objectives that will be covered so that you can understand the scope of the material.

It’s a TRAAP! Evaluating Information Sources

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Identify research tools & resources available through the USF Libraries
  2. Define the term “authority” as it pertains to research
  3. Identify at least three indicators of authority when presented with a list of possible criteria
  4. Correctly identify each criteria of the TRAAP test for source evaluation
  5. Apply the TRAAP test to a set of provided examples

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Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Interpreting Graphs, Tables & Charts

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Explain why correct interpretation of quantitative evidence is important in research and career development
  2. Correctly identify examples of quantitative evidence, such as graphs, tables, and charts, when presented with different kinds of data
  3. Correctly match a provided set of graphs, tables or charts with their corresponding textual descriptions
  4. Correctly explain the information being conveyed by the data in a graph, table, or chart
  5. Identify different methods that are sometimes employed to mislead readers when presented with quantitative evidence
  6. Correctly identify misleading charts, tables and graphs when presented with both sound and intentionally deceptive examples

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Eavesdropping on Researchers: Discovering the Many Modes of Scholarly Communication

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the correct definition of scholarly or academic conversation
  2. Identify the student’s role as an active participant in scholarly or academic conversations
  3. Differentiate between formal and informal modalities of scholarly conversations
  4. Identify some of the features inherent in scholarly or academic conversations
  5. Explain how the modality of the conversation can affect the pace of the conversation and scholarly publication cycle

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Every Issue has Two Sides: Discovering Evidence for Opposing Claims

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the characteristics of a hypothesis, claim, or argument
  2. Locate the hypothesis in a scholarly article
  3. Explain the core argument of a stated hypothesis
  4. Locate credible evidence that supports one side of a claim or argument
  5. Discuss given examples of opposing, credible claims to a fact or hypothesis

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Going Down the Rabbit Hole: Finding Relevant Information for your Paper

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Articulate strategies for locating relevant sources of information as they pertain to the research question
  2. Determine the relevance of sources when provided with an example research question
  3. Identify additional search paths by employing hyperlinked terms in databases or bibliography citations

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That Changes Everything! Seeing Shifts in Scholarly Perspectives

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss example sources from different time periods, illustrating how scholarly perspectives have changed over time
  2. Identify possible causes for shifts in scholarly perspective, such as changes in knowledge, understanding, or culture
  3. Locate library resources published in different time periods that demonstrate shifts in perspective over time
  4. Discuss how scholarly perspectives have shifted over time for a particular topic when presented with a set of examples

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Researching Like Goldilocks: Creating a Topic that is Neither Too Broad Nor Too Narrow

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the components of the research process
  2. Identify types of sources that will provide basic & advanced knowledge on a topic
  3. Identify the characteristics that make a topic either too broad or too narrow
  4. Create a manageable topic or research question
  5. Create a search plan by employing concept maps or identifying search terms related to a particular topic or research question

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Help, I Need This! How Do I Find It?

After completing this workshop, students will be able to identify the following:

  1. Locations for style manuals in the Library
  2. Citations for books, book chapters, print journal articles and online journal articles.
  3. Where to look to identify if the Library has the materials you need.
  4. How to obtain a source if the Library does not own it.

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Avoiding Plagiarism

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Identify USF sanctions for students who plagiarize
  2. Define plagiarism
  3. Define “common knowledge”
  4. Identify types of plagiarism
  5. Read citations for three major formats containing information (books, book chapters, articles)
  6. Identify three different citation styles
  7. Identify various tools to help you with citing your sources.

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Conducting a Literature Review

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the purpose and function of a literature review
  2. Develop a topic
  3. Identify appropriate databases
  4. Employ effective search strategies, such as Boolean logic, controlled vocabularies, and cited reference searching
  5. Evaluate sources
  6. Organize a literature review

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Find History

After completing this workshop, students will be able to:

  1. Identify databases for historical research
  2. Locate special collections and archival resources, physical and digital
  3. Find and evaluate primary and secondary sources
  4. Get sources the Library doesn’t have

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